Recipe : Quick Rosemary & Garlic Mushrooms

Recipe : Rosemary & Garlic Mushrooms

(Healthcastle.com) This side dish is a refreshing change from salads and comes together in only 10 minutes. Not to mention it is fancy enough to impress your guests without slaving over the stove for hours and has just enough richness to make your meal feel special without compromising your pant size.

The details

Mushrooms are often overlooked but they really are a nutrient dense food. At only 19 calories per cup of sliced ‘shrooms, they still pack a hefty punch of some of the B vitamins – niacin, pantothenic acid and riboflavin – and are a great source of selenium, a nutrient most of us don’t get enough of and a key part of  healthy thyroid function and glowing skin. Not to mention mushrooms are a natural source of umami- the “fifth” taste that lights up our pleasure centre. What’s not to love?

While I have nothing against cow’s milk I encourage you to experiment with different kinds of dairy – just like with grains, fruits and veggies variety is important so give goat a try if you haven’t  yet! Goat cheese can range from mild to very goat-y so find one that suits your tastes and go from there. Many who find themselves sensitive to cow’s milk actually tolerate goat’s milk much and cheese much better so give it a try, it really adds a nice bit of richness without making the dish too heavy in calories or taste.  If you have a true milk allergy always be careful, there is some cross reactivity between the two.

Remember that fresh and dried herbs are packed with nutrition and a great way to amp up the healing and anti-inflammatory value of your meal, not to mention provide fantastic flavour. Don’t leave them out of your cooking! It’s the number one thing that separates boring food from tasty food in a home kitchen and keeps meals from all tasting the same.

Recipe:

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced (use a knife or a garlic presss- no one will know the difference!)
  • 2 tbsp of fresh rosemary leaves (about 1 large sprig, leaves removed from stem), finely chopped (substitute 1 tsp dried rosemary)
  • 4 cups brown or crimini mushrooms, sliced
  • 1/16 tsp salt (good pinch- I fill my 1/8 tsp half full to get this measurement)
  • 1/8 tsp ground pepper
  • 1 tbsp white wine
  • 1 big handful (1-2 cups) washed and dried baby spinach (tear in to pieces if using mature spinach)
  • 2 heaping tbsp goat cheese, crumbled

Directions

  1. Heat olive oil over medium low in a large pan until it shimmers and moves easily. Add the garlic and sautee for about 2 minutes until it starts to soften. If the garlic is browning or the oil is spattering the heat is too high- burnt garlic has a really acrid taste so low and slow is a better bet in this step. Add the rosemary and salt and sautee for another minute.
  2. Add the mushrooms and toss with the mixture already in the pan until they all have a light coating of the oil. Add the pepper. If your pan is now bone dry, drizzle a little extra oil in- mushrooms are thirsty buggers! Sautee for 4 minutes until they begin to soften.
  3. Add the wine. If you are using a gas stove, you may want to remove the pan from the element (or turn it off momentarily) while you add the alcohol to prevent flare ups. Stir and toss the mushrooms until it is evaporated, about 2 minutes.
  4. Add the spinach and cook for another 1-2 minutes until it begins to wilt. Remove from heat, sprinkle the crumbled goat cheese on top and serve warm or cold.

Serving size 1/2 batch if it is the only side dish. Doubles or triples easily.

What are your favourite ways to use mushrooms? Share your ideas and experience with us in the comments below!

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